O, Advent has begun

So, I’ve been absent from my blog for over a year, for reasons I’ll not mention here. But Advent seems like a good time to re-commit to writing about spiritual, theological, and literary matters. I hope you’ll join me as I journey along my path after a down time.

I initially wrote this meditation as a submission for an Advent publication based on the O antiphons. This wasn’t used after all, (though another of my submissions was), so I present it to you as we await the coming of Christ.

“Faith and Faithful”

Come, o come,” says the child, as the earworm grows and uncurls among your neurons, leaving in its wake shards of lyrics and epic tones.

Arise, shine, for your light has come all ye faithful, joyful and arise, shine for your light has come and the glory of the Lord has dawned upon you.

“I know your mistrust of gifts, but this is between friends. I will be faithful.” You’re actively playing with the earworm now, trying to guide its course but now is not the time for laying straight the path.

Arise, shine, all ye faithful, joyful and triumphant, come ye o come ye to Bethlehem.

“I understand your brokenness.” The child’s voice is soft and sure. “I bring you my peace. And I will be faithful.”

Arise, shine, for your light has come, arise, shine for your light has come, has come ye faithful, to Bethlehem.

“My authority is not a yoke to crush you, but is a gift to empower you, to bring you life everlasting. I bring you my peace and I will be forever faithful.” Is that sorrow or hope in the child’s voice?

The earworm wends its way to your heart, its segmented melodies dissolving the stone while mending the cracks left by years of infidelity.

Arise, shine, arise, shine, for your life has come, all ye faithful, joyful and triumphant, for your life has come, o come . . .

and then–

“Rejoice, rejoice!” Strange echoes of other voices reverberate as the song bursts forth from your lips.

“Come, o come, give me my name,” the child smiles. “I am with you always.”

Image: Christ-Emmanuel, 1668, Board, 42*32, Russian Museum, from Wikimedia Commons

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s